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The Food Institute Blog

GrubHub Data Analysis Reveals Urban Dining Trends
Posted on April 24, 2015 by Bryan Wassel

Even with restaurant chains offering the same meals across the country, certain foods are more popular in some areas than other. Spread Sheet took a look at meal-ordering patterns on GrubHub across the country, analyzing the most common choices for affluent residents in eight urban areas. The results were each city having at least one item that was ordered at rates far above the national average, reported The Wall Street Journal.

The single biggest difference between regional and national orders was in San Francisco Bay Area, where steamed rice was chosen 923% as often as the average everywhere else. Residents of Chicago were 293% more likely to order pot stickers. The research also confirmed some beliefs, and found Chicago consumers were 267% as likely to order from a hot dog restaurant as the rest of the country, reinforcing the city's reputation as a home for frankfurters.

New York City saw eggs of any style ordered 331% more often, while Los Angeles had breakfast burritos 818% more popular and Washington, DC saw 528% more chocolate chip cookie orders as well as consumers 1,020% more likely than average to order from a restaurant with a dedicated dessert menu.

What would you order in your neighborhood? Do the findings match your preconceptions of these areas?

Posted in Foodservice  

 

About the Author

Bryan Wassel
Editorial Director
The Food Institute

With a background in both daily and weekly publications, Bryan has worked as a journalist since freelancing for his hometown paper in high school. He has since written both in print and online for min, The Times of Trenton and North Jersey Media Group, holding positions from stringer to editor. With a background as a news reporter, he has learned to seek out the focus behind the story, digging for the most important information. He has been with The Food Institute since 2013, where he edits Today in Food and The Food Institute Report, as well as puts together newsletters for several clients.

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